Teacher Presentations

I am available to conduct custom presentations or workshops, including any of the presentations below or follow-up presentations/workshops at your school, district or social studies department. Please email me at laurensbrown19@gmail.com for more information.

Below are the links/handouts for my presentations on the NCSS C3 framework, the Common Core, the U.S Constitution.

NEW IDEAS IN HISTORY & SOCIAL STUDIES: TEACHING WITH THE C3 FRAMEWORK - Wednesday, March 4, 2015, Northern Illinois University

Below are the links for the materials that were handed out at the above conference, including the PowerPoint and the full lessons.

For more info on using Essential/Compelling Questions & Big Ideas to tie units and lessons together, see the posts below from this blog:

  • August 31, 2014 - planning Colonial America Unit
  • November 19, 2014 (This is one I mentioned during the presentation that had the crazy drawing on it; deals with the Antebellum period)
  • December 12, 2014 - deals with the post-Reconstruction period/last 1/3 of 19th century
  • January 5, 2015 - how to organize 20th century US history
  • January 8, 2015 - how to conceptualize the Progressive Era
  • January 11, 2015 - more on how to organize the Progressive Era (plus thoughts about the attacks in Paris)


Here are the handouts/PPTs. Feel free to email me with questions!

ILLINOIS COUNCIL FOR THE SOCIAL STUDIES CONFERENCE, OCTOBER 17, 2014

SESSION A: 
THE COMMON CORE AND METHODS FOR USING PRIMARY & SECONDARY SOURCES IN THE SOCIAL STUDIES CLASSROOM 
Presented at the Illinois Council for the Social Studies Conference - October 17, 2014

Summary: The Common Core emphasizes critical thinking skills using both primary and secondary sources. This session will offer teachers a variety of ways to use those sources in the classroom as well as offer a practical way to understand how to connect what they already do to align with the standards.

Presentation handouts:

SESSION B: 
REIMAGINING HOW TO TEACH THE CONSTITUTION: PROMOTING CRITICAL THINKING USING THE TEXT
Presented at the Illinois Council for the Social Studies Conference - October 17, 2014

Summary: No document matters more to Americans than the Constitution. But too often, students are asked to memorize facts for a test and rarely have the opportunity to read the document itself. This presentation offers methods for teaching the Constitution that demand reading and thinking about the text itself, and aligns with the perspective offered by the Common Core State Standards.

Presentation handouts:
  • Click here for a nice, clean copy of the U.S. Constitution to reproduce for students. 
  • Images from PowerPoint slides
  • Handout for Conference attendees - includes a chart with brief definitions of all 5 principles along with the related essential questions, topics which one would cover in connection with the principle, and where they are found in the Constitution. Also contains sample problems for students.
  • Aligning the Common Core Standards to Teaching the Constitution - a chart that paraphrases the 10 CCSS reading standards in history and matches them to topics you would study in a unit on the Constitution.
  • Assignment Ideas/Projects for Students - these are small, research-based assignments that get students to engage with Constitutional issues, both current and historical.
  • Common Questions asked by Students about the Constitution - I created this in response to the kinds of questions that caught off guard on when I first started teaching. It doesn't include all the answers, but provides links or at least things to search on your own to find answers.
  • Applying the Constitution: Problems for Students - These are problems that you can give students to work on in class. Best suited, I think, to work on in pairs, using a copy of the Constitution to help them and you, the teacher. Please note that these problems I got and revised from other teachers. I have no idea to whom to give credit for them. If you need a key, please email me.
  • Teaching ideas on Religious Freedom & the 1st Amendment
  • Note that I have blog posts about the Constitution under September & October 2014.
  • Click back to my home page to find an annoted list of links to other websites about the Constitution and goverment-related topics (on the bar at the top). 

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